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❶JEQR also welcomes submissions of all manuscripts that have not been presented at conferences. Numerical coding must be available in the published articles, if the methodology and findings are to be compared across research studies in traditional literature review and recommendation formats.

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Curated by Ronald J. Chenail
Excerpt from Editorial, Volume 12, Issue 1:

Such developments were necessary as qualitative researchers won national center awards, in collaboration with their research colleagues at other universities and departments; and university administrations funded Ph. Most theoretical constructs involve a process of qualitative analysis and understanding, and construction of these concepts e. In the s and s, the increasing ubiquity of computers aided in qualitative analyses, several journals with a qualitative focus emerged, and postpositivism gained recognition in the academy.

Also, during this time, researchers began to use mixed-method approaches, indicating a shift in thinking of qualitative and quantitative methods as intrinsically incompatible.

However, this history is not apolitical, as this has ushered in a politics of "evidence" e. Qualitative researchers face many choices for techniques to generate data ranging from grounded theory [17] development and practice, narratology , storytelling , transcript poetry , classical ethnography , state or governmental studies , research and service demonstrations , focus groups , case studies , participant observation , qualitative review of statistics in order to predict future happenings, or shadowing , among many others.

Qualitative methods are used in various methodological approaches, such as action research which has sociological basis, or actor-network theory. Other sources include focus groups, observation without a predefined theory like statistical theory in mind for example , reflective field notes, texts, pictures, photographs and other images, interactions and practice captured on audio or video recordings, public e. To analyse qualitative data, the researcher seeks meaning from all of the data that is available.

The data may be categorized and sorted into patterns i. The ways of participating and observing can vary widely from setting to setting as exemplified by Helen Schwartzman's primer on Ethnography in Organizations In participant observation [27] researchers typically become members of a culture, group, or setting, and adopt roles to conform to that setting. In doing so, the aim is for the researcher to gain a closer insight into the culture's practices, motivations, and emotions.

It is argued that the researchers' ability to understand the experiences of the culture may be inhibited if they observe without participating. The data that is obtained is streamlined texts of thousands of pages in length to a definite theme or pattern, or representation of a theory or systemic issue or approach. This step in a theoretical analysis or data analytic technique is further worked on e. An alternative research hypothesis is generated which finally provides the basis of the research statement for continuing work in the fields.

Some distinctive qualitative methods are the use of focus groups and key informant interviews , the latter often identified through sophisticated and sometimes, elitist, snowballing techniques. The focus group technique e.

The research then must be "written up" into a report, book chapter, journal paper, thesis or dissertation, using descriptions, quotes from participants, charts and tables to demonstrate the trustworthiness of the study findings. In qualitative research, the idea of recursivity is expressed in terms of the nature of its research procedures, which may be contrasted with experimental forms of research design. From the experimental perspective, its major stages of research data collection, data analysis, discussion of the data in context of the literature, and drawing conclusions should be each undertaken once or at most a small number of times in a research study.

In qualitative research however, all of the four stages above may be undertaken repeatedly until one or more specific stopping conditions are met, reflecting a nonstatic attitude to the planning and design of research activities.

An example of this dynamicism might be when the qualitative researcher unexpectedly changes their research focus or design midway through a research study, based on their 1st interim data analysis, and then makes further unplanned changes again based on a 2nd interim data analysis; this would be a terrible thing to do from the perspective of an predefined experimental study of the same thing.

Qualitative researchers would argue that their recursivity in developing the relevant evidence and reasoning, enables the researcher to be more open to unexpected results, more open to the potential of building new constructs, and the possibility of integrating them with the explanations developed continuously throughout a study.

Qualitative methods are often part of survey methodology, including telephone surveys and consumer satisfaction surveys. In fields that study households, a much debated topic is whether interviews should be conducted individually or collectively e. One traditional and specialized form of qualitative research is called cognitive testing or pilot testing which is used in the development of quantitative survey items. Survey items are piloted on study participants to test the reliability and validity of the items.

This approach is similar to psychological testing using an intelligence test like the WAIS Wechsler Adult Intelligence Survey in which the interviewer records "qualitative" i.

Qualitative research is often useful in a sociological lens. Although often ignored, qualitative research is of great value to sociological studies that can shed light on the intricacies in the functionality of society and human interaction. There are several different research approaches, or research designs, that qualitative researchers use. As a form of qualitative inquiry, students of interpretive inquiry interpretivists often disagree with the idea of theory-free observation or knowledge.

Whilst this crucial philosophical realization is also held by researchers in other fields, interpretivists are often the most aggressive in taking this philosophical realization to its logical conclusions. For example, an interpretivist researcher might believe in the existence of an objective reality 'out there', but argue that the social and educational reality we act on the basis of never allows a single human subject to directly access the reality 'out there' in reality this is a view shared by constructivist philosophies.

To researchers outside the qualitative research field, the most common analysis of qualitative data is often perceived to be observer impression. That is, expert or bystander observers examine the data, interpret it via forming an impression and report their impression in a structured and sometimes quantitative form. In general, coding refers to the act of associating meaningful ideas with the data of interest.

In the context of qualitative research, interpretative aspects of the coding process are often explicitly recognized, articulated, and celebrated; producing specific words or short phrases believed to be useful abstractions over the data.

As an act of sense making, most coding requires the qualitative analyst to read the data and demarcate segments within it, which may be done at multiple and different times throughout the data analysis process.

In contrast with more quantitative forms of coding, mathematical ideas and forms are usually under-developed in a 'pure' qualitative data analysis. When coding is complete, the analyst may prepare reports via a mix of: Some qualitative data that is highly structured e.

Quantitative analysis based on codes from statistical theory is typically the capstone analytical step for this type of qualitative data. Contemporary qualitative data analyses are often supported by computer programs termed Computer Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis Software used with or without the detailed hand coding and labeling of the past decades.

These programs do not supplant the interpretive nature of coding, but rather are aimed at enhancing analysts' efficiency at applying, retrieving, and storing the codes generated from reading the data. Many programs enhance efficiency in editing and revision of codes, which allow for more effective work sharing, peer review, recursive examination of data, and analysis of large datasets.

A frequent criticism of quantitative coding approaches is against the transformation of qualitative data into predefined nomothetic data structures, underpinned by 'objective properties '; the variety, richness, and individual characteristics of the qualitative data is argued to be largely omitted from such data coding processes, rendering the original collection of qualitative data somewhat pointless.

To defend against the criticism of too much subjective variability in the categories and relationships identified from data, qualitative analysts respond by thoroughly articulating their definitions of codes and linking those codes soundly to the underlying data, thereby preserving some of the richness that might be absent from a mere list of codes, whilst satisfying the need for repeatable procedure held by experimentally oriented researchers.

As defined by Leshan , [39] this is a method of qualitative data analysis where qualitative datasets are analyzed without coding. A common method here is recursive abstraction, where datasets are summarized; those summaries are therefore furthered into summary and so on. The end result is a more compact summary that would have been difficult to accurately discern without the preceding steps of distillation.

A frequent criticism of recursive abstraction is that the final conclusions are several times removed from the underlying data. While it is true that poor initial summaries will certainly yield an inaccurate final report, qualitative analysts can respond to this criticism. They do so, like those using coding method, by documenting the reasoning behind each summary step, citing examples from the data where statements were included and where statements were excluded from the intermediate summary.

Some data analysis techniques, often referred to as the tedious, hard work of research studies similar to field notes, rely on using computers to scan and reduce large sets of qualitative data.

At their most basic level, numerical coding relies on counting words, phrases, or coincidences of tokens within the data; other similar techniques are the analyses of phrases and exchanges in conversational analyses. Often referred to as content analysis , a basic structural building block to conceptual analysis, the technique utilizes mixed methodology to unpack both small and large corpuses. Content analysis is frequently used in sociology to explore relationships, such as the change in perceptions of race over time Morning , or the lifestyles of temporal contractors Evans, et al.

Mechanical techniques are particularly well-suited for a few scenarios. One such scenario is for datasets that are simply too large for a human to effectively analyze, or where analysis of them would be cost prohibitive relative to the value of information they contain. Another scenario is when the chief value of a dataset is the extent to which it contains "red flags" e. Many researchers would consider these procedures on their data sets to be misuse of their data collection and purposes.

A frequent criticism of mechanical techniques is the absence of a human interpreter; computer analysis is relatively new having arrived in the late s to the university sectors. And while masters of these methods are able to write sophisticated software to mimic some human decisions, the bulk of the "analysis" is still nonhuman.

Analysts respond by proving the value of their methods relative to either a hiring and training a human team to analyze the data or b by letting the data go untouched, leaving any actionable nuggets undiscovered; almost all coding schemes indicate probably studies for further research. Data sets and their analyses must also be written up, reviewed by other researchers, circulated for comments, and finalized for public review. Numerical coding must be available in the published articles, if the methodology and findings are to be compared across research studies in traditional literature review and recommendation formats.

Contemporary qualitative research has been conducted using a large number of paradigms that influence conceptual and metatheoretical concerns of legitimacy, control, data analysis , ontology , and epistemology , among others. Qualitative research conducted in the twenty-first century has been characterized by a distinct turn toward more interpretive , postmodern , and critical practices.

In particular, commensurability involves the extent to which concerns from 2 paradigms e. Likewise, critical, constructivist, and participatory paradigms are commensurable on certain issues e.

Qualitative research in the s has also been characterized by concern with everyday categorization and ordinary storytelling. This "narrative turn" is producing an enormous literature as researchers present sensitizing concepts and perspectives that bear especially on narrative practice, which centers on the circumstances and communicative actions of storytelling.

Catherine Riessman and Gubrium and Holstein provide analytic strategies, and Holstein and Gubrium present the variety of approaches in recent comprehensive texts.

More recent developments in narrative practice has increasingly taken up the issue of institutional conditioning of such practices see Gubrium and Holstein A central issue in qualitative research is trustworthiness also known as credibility, or in quantitative studies, validity. There are many different ways of establishing trustworthiness, including: Most of these methods are described in Lincoln and Guba Again, Lincoln and Guba is the salient reference.

By the end of the s many leading journals began to publish qualitative research articles [47] and several new journals emerged which published only qualitative research studies and articles about qualitative research methods.

Wilhelm Wundt , the founder of scientific psychology, was one of the first psychologists to conduct qualitative research. Wundt advocated the strong relation between psychology and philosophy.

He believed that there was a gap between psychology and quantitative research that could only be filled by conducting qualitative research. There are records of qualitative research being used in psychology before World War II, but prior to the s, these methods were viewed as invalid. Owing to this, many of the psychologists who practiced qualitative research denied the usage of such methods or apologized for doing so.

It was not until the late 20th century when qualitative research was accepted in elements of psychology though it remains controversial. Community psychologists felt they didn't get the recognition they deserved.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Qualitative study. Not to be confused with qualitative data. For the journal, see Qualitative Research journal.

This article has multiple issues. In the spirit of open academic inquiry, views expressed in the articles represent the respective authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the editors or Cedarville University.

EQRC possesses a long and rich tradition as a forum for dissemination of scholarly ideas in the qualitative research tradition. The conference is held in early February, with the call for papers issued in fall semester.

In addition to EQRC, the journal also publishes juried papers from a number of other quality conferences, following independent peer-review by JEQR staff and its review board members. Please notify the JEQR editor if you are aware of other qualitative research conferences that may desire affiliation with the journal.

JEQR also welcomes submissions of all manuscripts that have not been presented at conferences. Although authors often benefit from the feedback received through conference presentation, it is not an explicit or implicit requirement for JEQR publication and the editorial staff welcome all original manuscripts that are not simultaneously under other journal publication consideration or review.

Summary of Instructions to Authors. Initial Screening by Journal Editors. Abstracts from Previous Volumes.


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Qualitative Research Journal (QRJ) is an international journal devoted to the communication of the theory and practice of qualitative research in the human sciences. It is interdisciplinary and eclectic, covering all methodologies that can be described as qualitative. The Qualitative Report (ISSN ) is a peer-reviewed, on-line monthly journal devoted to writing and discussion of and about qualitative, critical, action, and collaborative inquiry and research. The Qualitative Report, the oldest multidisciplinary qualitative research journal in the world.